Package io.ebean

Interface Query<T>

  • Type Parameters:
    T - the type of Entity bean this query will fetch.

    public interface Query<T>
    Object relational query for finding a List, Set, Map or single entity bean.

    Example: Create the query using the API.

    
    
     List<Order> orderList = DB.find(Order.class)
         .where()
           .like("customer.name","rob%")
           .gt("orderDate",lastWeek)
         .orderBy("customer.id, id desc")
         .setMaxRows(50)
         .findList();
    
     ...
     

    Example: The same query using the query language

    
    
     String oql =
       	+" where customer.name like :custName and orderDate > :minOrderDate "
       	+" order by customer.id, id desc "
       	+" limit 50 ";
    
     List<Order> orderList = DB.createQuery(Order.class, oql)
       .setParameter("custName", "Rob%")
       .setParameter("minOrderDate", lastWeek)
       .findList();
     ...
     

    AutoTune

    Ebean has built in support for "AutoTune". This is a mechanism where a query can be automatically tuned based on profiling information that is collected.

    This is effectively the same as automatically using select() and fetch() to build a query that will fetch all the data required by the application and no more.

    It is expected that AutoTune will be the default approach for many queries in a system. It is possibly not as useful where the result of a query is sent to a remote client or where there is some requirement for "Read Consistency" guarantees.

    Query Language

    Partial Objects

    The find and fetch clauses support specifying a list of properties to fetch. This results in objects that are "partially populated". If you try to get a property that was not populated a "lazy loading" query will automatically fire and load the rest of the properties of the bean (This is very similar behaviour as a reference object being "lazy loaded").

    Partial objects can be saved just like fully populated objects. If you do this you should remember to include the "Version" property in the initial fetch. If you do not include a version property then optimistic concurrency checking will occur but only include the fetched properties. Refer to "ALL Properties/Columns" mode of Optimistic Concurrency checking.

    
     [ select [ ( * | {fetch properties} ) ] ]
     [ fetch {path} [ ( * | {fetch properties} ) ] ]
     [ where {predicates} ]
     [ order by {order by properties} ]
     [ limit {max rows} [ offset {first row} ] ]
     

    SELECT [ ( * | {fetch properties} ) ]

    With the select you can specify a list of properties to fetch.

    FETCH {path} [ ( * | {fetch properties} ) ]

    With the fetch you specify the associated property to fetch and populate. The path is a OneToOne, ManyToOne, OneToMany or ManyToMany property.

    For fetch of a path we can optionally specify a list of properties to fetch. If you do not specify a list of properties ALL the properties for that bean type are fetched.

    WHERE {list of predicates}

    The list of predicates which are joined by AND OR NOT ( and ). They can include named (or positioned) bind parameters. These parameters will need to be bound by setParameter(String, Object).

    ORDER BY {order by properties}

    The list of properties to order the result. You can include ASC (ascending) and DESC (descending) in the order by clause.

    LIMIT {max rows} [ OFFSET {first row} ]

    The limit offset specifies the max rows and first row to fetch. The offset is optional.

    Examples of Ebean's Query Language

    Find orders fetching its id, shipDate and status properties. Note that the id property is always fetched even if it is not included in the list of fetch properties.

    
    
     select (shipDate, status)
    
     

    Find orders with a named bind variable (that will need to be bound via setParameter(String, Object)).

    
    
     where customer.name like :custLike
    
     

    Find orders and also fetch the customer with a named bind parameter. This will fetch and populate both the order and customer objects.

    
    
     fetch customer
     where customer.id = :custId
    
     

    Find orders and also fetch the customer, customer shippingAddress, order details and related product. Note that customer and product objects will be "Partial Objects" with only some of their properties populated. The customer objects will have their id, name and shipping address populated. The product objects (associated with each order detail) will have their id, sku and name populated.

    
    
     fetch customer (name)
     fetch customer.shippingAddress
     fetch details
     fetch details.product (sku, name)
    
     
    • Method Detail

      • asOf

        Query<TasOf​(Timestamp asOf)
        Perform an 'As of' query using history tables to return the object graph as of a time in the past.

        To perform this query the DB must have underlying history tables.

        Parameters:
        asOf - the date time in the past at which you want to view the data
      • asDraft

        Query<TasDraft()
        Execute the query against the draft set of tables.
      • asDto

        <D> DtoQuery<D> asDto​(Class<D> dtoClass)
        Convert the query to a DTO bean query.

        We effectively use the underlying ORM query to build the SQL and then execute and map it into DTO beans.

      • asUpdate

        UpdateQuery<TasUpdate()
        Convert the query to a UpdateQuery.

        Typically this is used with query beans to covert a query bean query into an UpdateQuery like the examples below.

        
        
          int rowsUpdated = new QCustomer()
               .name.startsWith("Rob")
               .asUpdate()
               .set("active", false)
               .update();;
        
         
        
        
           int rowsUpdated = new QContact()
               .notes.note.startsWith("Make Inactive")
               .email.endsWith("@foo.com")
               .customer.id.equalTo(42)
               .asUpdate()
               .set("inactive", true)
               .setRaw("email = lower(email)")
               .update();
        
         
      • cancel

        void cancel()
        Cancel the query execution if supported by the underlying database and driver.

        This must be called from a different thread to the query executor.

      • copy

        Query<Tcopy()
        Return a copy of the query.

        This is so that you can use a Query as a "prototype" for creating other query instances. You could create a Query with various where expressions and use that as a "prototype" - using this copy() method to create a new instance that you can then add other expressions then execute.

      • setDocIndexName

        Query<TsetDocIndexName​(String indexName)
        Set the index(es) to search for a document store which uses partitions.

        For example, when executing a query against ElasticSearch with daily indexes we can explicitly specify the indexes to search against.

        
        
           // explicitly specify the indexes to search
           query.setDocIndexName("logstash-2016.11.5,logstash-2016.11.6")
        
           // search today's index
           query.setDocIndexName("$today")
        
           // search the last 3 days
           query.setDocIndexName("$last-3")
        
         

        If the indexName is specified with ${daily} e.g. "logstash-${daily}" ... then we can use $today and $last-x as the search docIndexName like the examples below.

        
        
           // search today's index
           query.setDocIndexName("$today")
        
           // search the last 3 days
           query.setDocIndexName("$last-3")
        
         
        Parameters:
        indexName - The index or indexes to search against
        Returns:
        This query
      • isAutoTuned

        boolean isAutoTuned()
        Returns true if this query was tuned by autoTune.
      • setAutoTune

        Query<TsetAutoTune​(boolean autoTune)
        Explicitly specify whether to use AutoTune for this query.

        If you do not call this method on a query the "Implicit AutoTune mode" is used to determine if AutoTune should be used for a given query.

        AutoTune can add additional fetch paths to the query and specify which properties are included for each path. If you have explicitly defined some fetch paths AutoTune will not remove them.

      • setAllowLoadErrors

        Query<TsetAllowLoadErrors()
        Execute the query allowing properties with invalid JSON to be collected and not fail the query.
        
        
           // fetch a bean with JSON content
           EBasicJsonList bean= DB.find(EBasicJsonList.class)
               .setId(42)
               .setAllowLoadErrors()  // collect errors into bean state if we have invalid JSON
               .findOne();
        
        
           // get the invalid JSON errors from the bean state
           Map<String, Exception> errors = server().getBeanState(bean).getLoadErrors();
        
           // If this map is not empty tell we have invalid JSON
           // and should try and fix the JSON content or inform the user
        
         
      • setLazyLoadBatchSize

        Query<TsetLazyLoadBatchSize​(int lazyLoadBatchSize)
        Set the default lazy loading batch size to use.

        When lazy loading is invoked on beans loaded by this query then this sets the batch size used to load those beans.

        Parameters:
        lazyLoadBatchSize - the number of beans to lazy load in a single batch
      • setIncludeSoftDeletes

        Query<TsetIncludeSoftDeletes()
        Execute the query including soft deleted rows.

        This means that Ebean will not add any predicates to the query for filtering out soft deleted rows. You can still add your own predicates for the deleted properties and effectively you have full control over the query to include or exclude soft deleted rows as needed for a given use case.

      • setDisableReadAuditing

        Query<TsetDisableReadAuditing()
        Disable read auditing for this query.

        This is intended to be used when the query is not a user initiated query and instead part of the internal processing in an application to load a cache or document store etc. In these cases we don't want the query to be part of read auditing.

      • select

        Query<Tselect​(String fetchProperties)
        Specify the properties to fetch on the root level entity bean in comma delimited format.

        The Id property is automatically included in the properties to fetch unless setDistinct(true) is set on the query.

        Use fetch(String, String) to specify specific properties to fetch on other non-root level paths of the object graph.

        
        
         List<Customer> customers = DB.find(Customer.class)
             // Only fetch the customer id, name and status.
             // This is described as a "Partial Object"
             .select("name, status")
             .where.ilike("name", "rob%")
             .findList();
        
         
        Parameters:
        fetchProperties - the properties to fetch for this bean (* = all properties).
      • select

        Query<Tselect​(FetchGroup<T> fetchGroup)
        Apply the fetchGroup which defines what part of the object graph to load.
      • fetch

        Query<Tfetch​(String path,
                       String fetchProperties)
        Specify a path to fetch eagerly including specific properties.

        Ebean will endeavour to fetch this path using a SQL join. If Ebean determines that it can not use a SQL join (due to maxRows or because it would result in a cartesian product) Ebean will automatically convert this fetch query into a "query join" - i.e. use fetchQuery().

        
        
         // query orders...
         List<Order> orders = DB.find(Order.class)
               // fetch the customer...
               // ... getting the customers name and phone number
               .fetch("customer", "name, phoneNumber")
        
               // ... also fetch the customers billing address (* = all properties)
               .fetch("customer.billingAddress", "*")
               .findList();
         

        If columns is null or "*" then all columns/properties for that path are fetched.

        
        
         // fetch customers (their id, name and status)
         List<Customer> customers = DB.find(Customer.class)
             .select("name, status")
             .fetch("contacts", "firstName,lastName,email")
             .findList();
        
         
        Parameters:
        path - the property path we wish to fetch eagerly.
        fetchProperties - properties of the associated bean that you want to include in the fetch (* means all properties, null also means all properties).
      • fetchQuery

        Query<TfetchQuery​(String path,
                            String fetchProperties)
        Fetch the path and properties using a "query join" (separate SQL query).

        This is the same as:

        
        
          fetch(path, fetchProperties, new FetchConfig().query())
        
         

        This would be used instead of a fetch() when we use a separate SQL query to fetch this part of the object graph rather than a SQL join.

        We might typically get a performance benefit when the path to fetch is a OneToMany or ManyToMany, the 'width' of the 'root bean' is wide and the cardinality of the many is high.

        Parameters:
        path - the property path we wish to fetch eagerly.
        fetchProperties - properties of the associated bean that you want to include in the fetch (* means all properties, null also means all properties).
      • fetchCache

        Query<TfetchCache​(String path,
                            String fetchProperties)
        Fetch the path and properties using L2 bean cache.
        Parameters:
        path - The path of the beans we are fetching from L2 cache.
        fetchProperties - The properties that should be loaded.
      • fetchLazy

        Query<TfetchLazy​(String path,
                           String fetchProperties)
        Fetch the path and properties lazily (via batch lazy loading).

        This is the same as:

        
        
          fetch(path, fetchProperties, new FetchConfig().lazy())
        
         

        The reason for using fetchLazy() is to either:

        • Control/tune what is fetched as part of lazy loading
        • Make use of the L2 cache, build this part of the graph from L2 cache
        Parameters:
        path - the property path we wish to fetch lazily.
        fetchProperties - properties of the associated bean that you want to include in the fetch (* means all properties, null also means all properties).
      • fetch

        Query<Tfetch​(String path,
                       String fetchProperties,
                       FetchConfig fetchConfig)
        Additionally specify a FetchConfig to use a separate query or lazy loading to load this path.
        
        
         // fetch customers (their id, name and status)
         List<Customer> customers = DB.find(Customer.class)
             .select("name, status")
             .fetch("contacts", "firstName,lastName,email", new FetchConfig().lazy(10))
             .findList();
        
         
        Parameters:
        path - the property path we wish to fetch eagerly.
      • fetch

        Query<Tfetch​(String path)
        Specify a path to fetch eagerly including all its properties.

        Ebean will endeavour to fetch this path using a SQL join. If Ebean determines that it can not use a SQL join (due to maxRows or because it would result in a cartesian product) Ebean will automatically convert this fetch query into a "query join" - i.e. use fetchQuery().

        
        
         // fetch customers (their id, name and status)
         List<Customer> customers = DB.find(Customer.class)
             // eager fetch the contacts
             .fetch("contacts")
             .findList();
        
         
        Parameters:
        path - the property path we wish to fetch eagerly.
      • fetchQuery

        Query<TfetchQuery​(String path)
        Fetch the path eagerly using a "query join" (separate SQL query).

        This is the same as:

        
        
          fetch(path, new FetchConfig().query())
        
         

        This would be used instead of a fetch() when we use a separate SQL query to fetch this part of the object graph rather than a SQL join.

        We might typically get a performance benefit when the path to fetch is a OneToMany or ManyToMany, the 'width' of the 'root bean' is wide and the cardinality of the many is high.

        Parameters:
        path - the property path we wish to fetch eagerly
      • fetchLazy

        Query<TfetchLazy​(String path)
        Fetch the path lazily (via batch lazy loading).

        This is the same as:

        
        
          fetch(path, new FetchConfig().lazy())
        
         

        The reason for using fetchLazy() is to either:

        • Control/tune what is fetched as part of lazy loading
        • Make use of the L2 cache, build this part of the graph from L2 cache
        Parameters:
        path - the property path we wish to fetch lazily.
      • fetch

        Query<Tfetch​(String path,
                       FetchConfig fetchConfig)
        Additionally specify a JoinConfig to specify a "query join" and or define the lazy loading query.
        
        
         // fetch customers (their id, name and status)
         List<Customer> customers = DB.find(Customer.class)
             // lazy fetch contacts with a batch size of 100
             .fetch("contacts", new FetchConfig().lazy(100))
             .findList();
        
         
      • apply

        Query<Tapply​(FetchPath fetchPath)
        Apply the path properties replacing the select and fetch clauses.

        This is typically used when the FetchPath is applied to both the query and the JSON output.

      • findIds

        @Nonnull
        <A> List<A> findIds()
        Execute the query returning the list of Id's.

        This query will execute against the Database that was used to create it.

      • findIterate

        @Nonnull
        QueryIterator<TfindIterate()
        Execute the query iterating over the results.

        Note that findIterate (and findEach and findEachWhile) uses a "per graph" persistence context scope and adjusts jdbc fetch buffer size for large queries. As such it is better to use findList for small queries.

        Remember that with QueryIterator you must call QueryIterator.close() when you have finished iterating the results (typically in a finally block).

        findEach() and findEachWhile() are preferred to findIterate() as they ensure the jdbc statement and resultSet are closed at the end of the iteration.

        This query will execute against the Database that was used to create it.

        
        
          Query<Customer> query = DB.find(Customer.class)
             .where().eq("status", Status.NEW)
             .order().asc("id");
        
          // use try with resources to ensure QueryIterator is closed
        
          try (QueryIterator<Customer> it = query.findIterate()) {
            while (it.hasNext()) {
              Customer customer = it.next();
              // do something with customer ...
            }
          }
        
         
      • findStream

        @Nonnull
        Stream<TfindStream()
        Execute the query returning the result as a Stream.

        Note that this will hold all resulting beans in memory using a single persistence context. Use findLargeStream() for queries that expect to return a large number of results.

        
        
          // use try with resources to ensure Stream is closed
        
          try (Stream<Customer> stream = query.findStream()) {
            stream
            .map(...)
            .collect(...);
          }
        
         
      • findLargeStream

        @Nonnull
        Stream<TfindLargeStream()
        Execute the query returning the result as a Stream.

        Note that this uses multiple persistence contexts such that we can use it with a large number of results.

        
        
          // use try with resources to ensure Stream is closed
        
          try (Stream<Customer> stream = query.findLargeStream()) {
            stream
            .map(...)
            .collect(...);
          }
        
         
      • findEach

        void findEach​(Consumer<T> consumer)
        Execute the query processing the beans one at a time.

        This method is appropriate to process very large query results as the beans are consumed one at a time and do not need to be held in memory (unlike #findList #findSet etc)

        Note that findEach (and findEachWhile and findIterate) uses a "per graph" persistence context scope and adjusts jdbc fetch buffer size for large queries. As such it is better to use findList for small queries.

        Note that internally Ebean can inform the JDBC driver that it is expecting larger resultSet and specifically for MySQL this hint is required to stop it's JDBC driver from buffering the entire resultSet. As such, for smaller resultSets findList() is generally preferable.

        Compared with #findEachWhile this will always process all the beans where as #findEachWhile provides a way to stop processing the query result early before all the beans have been read.

        This method is functionally equivalent to findIterate() but instead of using an iterator uses the Consumer interface which is better suited to use with Java8 closures.

        
        
          DB.find(Customer.class)
             .where().eq("status", Status.NEW)
             .order().asc("id")
             .findEach((Customer customer) -> {
        
               // do something with customer
               System.out.println("-- visit " + customer);
             });
        
         
        Parameters:
        consumer - the consumer used to process the queried beans.
      • findEachWhile

        void findEachWhile​(Predicate<T> consumer)
        Execute the query using callbacks to a visitor to process the resulting beans one at a time.

        Note that findEachWhile (and findEach and findIterate) uses a "per graph" persistence context scope and adjusts jdbc fetch buffer size for large queries. As such it is better to use findList for small queries.

        This method is functionally equivalent to findIterate() but instead of using an iterator uses the Predicate (SAM) interface which is better suited to use with Java8 closures.

        
        
          DB.find(Customer.class)
             .fetch("contacts", new FetchConfig().query(2))
             .where().eq("status", Status.NEW)
             .order().asc("id")
             .setMaxRows(2000)
             .findEachWhile((Customer customer) -> {
        
               // do something with customer
               System.out.println("-- visit " + customer);
        
               // return true to continue processing or false to stop
               return (customer.getId() < 40);
             });
        
         
        Parameters:
        consumer - the consumer used to process the queried beans.
      • findList

        @Nonnull
        List<TfindList()
        Execute the query returning the list of objects.

        This query will execute against the Database that was used to create it.

        
        
         List<Customer> customers = DB.find(Customer.class)
             .where().ilike("name", "rob%")
             .findList();
        
         
      • findSet

        @Nonnull
        Set<TfindSet()
        Execute the query returning the set of objects.

        This query will execute against the Database that was used to create it.

        
        
         Set<Customer> customers = DB.find(Customer.class)
             .where().ilike("name", "rob%")
             .findSet();
        
         
      • findMap

        @Nonnull
        <K> Map<K,​TfindMap()
        Execute the query returning a map of the objects.

        This query will execute against the Database that was used to create it.

        You can use setMapKey() so specify the property values to be used as keys on the map. If one is not specified then the id property is used.

        
        
         Map<String, Product> map = DB.find(Product.class)
             .setMapKey("sku")
             .findMap();
        
         
      • findSingleAttributeList

        @Nonnull
        <A> List<A> findSingleAttributeList()
        Execute the query returning a list of values for a single property.

        Example 1:

        
        
          List<String> names =
            DB.find(Customer.class)
              .select("name")
              .orderBy().asc("name")
              .findSingleAttributeList();
        
         

        Example 2:

        
        
          List<String> names =
            DB.find(Customer.class)
              .setDistinct(true)
              .select("name")
              .where().eq("status", Customer.Status.NEW)
              .orderBy().asc("name")
              .setMaxRows(100)
              .findSingleAttributeList();
        
         
        Returns:
        the list of values for the selected property
      • findSingleAttribute

        <A> A findSingleAttribute()
        Execute a query returning a single value of a single property/column.

        
        
          String name =
            DB.find(Customer.class)
              .select("name")
              .where().eq("id", 42)
              .findSingleAttribute();
        
         
      • isCountDistinct

        boolean isCountDistinct()
        Return true if this is countDistinct query.
      • exists

        boolean exists()
        Execute the query returning true if a row is found.

        The query is executed using max rows of 1 and will only select the id property. This method is really just a convenient way to optimise a query to perform a 'does a row exist in the db' check.

        Example using a query bean:

        
        
           boolean userExists =
             new QContact()
               .email.equalTo("rob@foo.com")
               .exists();
        
         

        Example:

        
        
           boolean userExists = query()
             .where().eq("email", "rob@foo.com")
             .exists();
        
         
        Returns:
        True if the query finds a matching row in the database
      • findOne

        @Nullable
        T findOne()
        Execute the query returning either a single bean or null (if no matching bean is found).

        If more than 1 row is found for this query then a NonUniqueResultException is thrown.

        This is useful when your predicates dictate that your query should only return 0 or 1 results.

        
        
         // assuming the sku of products is unique...
         Product product = DB.find(Product.class)
                 .where().eq("sku", "aa113")
                 .findOne();
         ...
         

        It is also useful with finding objects by their id when you want to specify further join information.

        
        
         // Fetch order 1 and additionally fetch join its order details...
         Order order = DB.find(Order.class)
               .setId(1)
               .fetch("details")
               .findOne();
        
         // the order details were eagerly loaded
         List<OrderDetail> details = order.getDetails();
         ...
         
        Throws:
        javax.persistence.NonUniqueResultException - if more than one result was found
      • findVersions

        @Nonnull
        List<Version<T>> findVersions()
        Return versions of a @History entity bean.

        Note that this query will work against view based history implementations but not sql2011 standards based implementations that require a start and end timestamp to be specified.

        Generally this query is expected to be a find by id or unique predicates query. It will execute the query against the history returning the versions of the bean.

      • findVersionsBetween

        @Nonnull
        List<Version<T>> findVersionsBetween​(Timestamp start,
                                             Timestamp end)
        Return versions of a @History entity bean between the 2 timestamps.

        Generally this query is expected to be a find by id or unique predicates query. It will execute the query against the history returning the versions of the bean.

      • delete

        int delete()
        Execute as a delete query deleting the 'root level' beans that match the predicates in the query.

        Note that if the query includes joins then the generated delete statement may not be optimal depending on the database platform.

        Returns:
        the number of beans/rows that were deleted.
      • delete

        int delete​(Transaction transaction)
        Execute as a delete query returning the number of rows deleted using the given transaction.

        Note that if the query includes joins then the generated delete statement may not be optimal depending on the database platform.

        Returns:
        the number of beans/rows that were deleted.
      • update

        int update()
        Execute the UpdateQuery returning the number of rows updated.
        Returns:
        the number of beans/rows updated.
      • update

        int update​(Transaction transaction)
        Execute the UpdateQuery returning the number of rows updated using the given transaction.
        Returns:
        the number of beans/rows updated.
      • findCount

        int findCount()
        Return the count of entities this query should return.

        This is the number of 'top level' or 'root level' entities.

      • findFutureCount

        @Nonnull
        FutureRowCount<TfindFutureCount()
        Execute find row count query in a background thread.

        This returns a Future object which can be used to cancel, check the execution status (isDone etc) and get the value (with or without a timeout).

        Returns:
        a Future object for the row count query
      • findFutureIds

        @Nonnull
        FutureIds<TfindFutureIds()
        Execute find Id's query in a background thread.

        This returns a Future object which can be used to cancel, check the execution status (isDone etc) and get the value (with or without a timeout).

        Returns:
        a Future object for the list of Id's
      • findFutureList

        @Nonnull
        FutureList<TfindFutureList()
        Execute find list query in a background thread.

        This query will execute in it's own PersistenceContext and using its own transaction. What that means is that it will not share any bean instances with other queries.

        Returns:
        a Future object for the list result of the query
      • findPagedList

        @Nonnull
        PagedList<TfindPagedList()
        Return a PagedList for this query using firstRow and maxRows.

        The benefit of using this over findList() is that it provides functionality to get the total row count etc.

        If maxRows is not set on the query prior to calling findPagedList() then a PersistenceException is thrown.

        
        
          PagedList<Order> pagedList = DB.find(Order.class)
               .setFirstRow(50)
               .setMaxRows(20)
               .findPagedList();
        
               // fetch the total row count in the background
               pagedList.loadRowCount();
        
               List<Order> orders = pagedList.getList();
               int totalRowCount = pagedList.getTotalRowCount();
        
         
        Returns:
        The PagedList
      • setParameter

        Query<TsetParameter​(String name,
                              Object value)
        Set a named bind parameter. Named parameters have a colon to prefix the name.
        
        
         // a query with a named parameter
         String oql = "find order where status = :orderStatus";
        
         List<Order> list = DB.find(Order.class, oql)
           .setParameter("orderStatus", OrderStatus.NEW)
           .findList();
        
         
        Parameters:
        name - the parameter name
        value - the parameter value
      • setParameter

        Query<TsetParameter​(int position,
                              Object value)
        Set an ordered bind parameter according to its position. Note that the position starts at 1 to be consistent with JDBC PreparedStatement. You need to set a parameter value for each ? you have in the query.
        
        
         // a query with a positioned parameter
         String oql = "where status = ? order by id desc";
        
         List<Order> list = DB.createQuery(Order.class, oql)
           .setParameter(1, OrderStatus.NEW)
           .findList();
        
         
        Parameters:
        position - the parameter bind position starting from 1 (not 0)
        value - the parameter bind value.
      • setId

        Query<TsetId​(Object id)
        Set the Id value to query. This is used with findOne().

        You can use this to have further control over the query. For example adding fetch joins.

        
        
         Order order = DB.find(Order.class)
             .setId(1)
             .fetch("details")
             .findOne();
        
         // the order details were eagerly fetched
         List<OrderDetail> details = order.getDetails();
        
         
      • where

        Query<Twhere​(Expression expression)
        Add a single Expression to the where clause returning the query.
        
        
         List<Order> newOrders = DB.find(Order.class)
         		.where().eq("status", Order.NEW)
         		.findList();
         ...
        
         
      • where

        ExpressionList<Twhere()
        Add Expressions to the where clause with the ability to chain on the ExpressionList. You can use this for adding multiple expressions to the where clause.
        
        
         List<Order> orders = DB.find(Order.class)
             .where()
               .eq("status", Order.NEW)
               .ilike("customer.name","rob%")
             .findList();
        
         
        Returns:
        The ExpressionList for adding expressions to.
        See Also:
        Expr
      • text

        ExpressionList<Ttext()
        Add Full text search expressions for Document store queries.

        This is currently ElasticSearch only and provides the full text expressions such as Match and Multi-Match.

        This automatically makes this query a "Doc Store" query and will execute against the document store (ElasticSearch).

        Expressions added here are added to the "query" section of an ElasticSearch query rather than the "filter" section.

        Expressions added to the where() are added to the "filter" section of an ElasticSearch query.

      • filterMany

        ExpressionList<TfilterMany​(String propertyName)
        This applies a filter on the 'many' property list rather than the root level objects.

        Typically you will use this in a scenario where the cardinality is high on the 'many' property you wish to join to. Say you want to fetch customers and their associated orders... but instead of getting all the orders for each customer you only want to get the new orders they placed since last week. In this case you can use filterMany() to filter the orders.

        
        
         List<Customer> list = DB.find(Customer.class)
             .fetch("orders")
             .where().ilike("name", "rob%")
             .filterMany("orders").eq("status", Order.Status.NEW).gt("orderDate", lastWeek)
             .findList();
        
         

        Please note you have to be careful that you add expressions to the correct expression list - as there is one for the 'root level' and one for each filterMany that you have.

        Parameters:
        propertyName - the name of the many property that you want to have a filter on.
        Returns:
        the expression list that you add filter expressions for the many to.
      • having

        ExpressionList<Thaving()
        Add Expressions to the Having clause return the ExpressionList.

        Currently only beans based on raw sql will use the having clause.

        Note that this returns the ExpressionList (so you can add multiple expressions to the query in a fluent API way).

        Returns:
        The ExpressionList for adding more expressions to.
        See Also:
        Expr
      • having

        Query<Thaving​(Expression addExpressionToHaving)
        Add an expression to the having clause returning the query.

        Currently only beans based on raw sql will use the having clause.

        This is similar to having() except it returns the query rather than the ExpressionList. This is useful when you want to further specify something on the query.

        Parameters:
        addExpressionToHaving - the expression to add to the having clause.
        Returns:
        the Query object
      • orderBy

        Query<TorderBy​(String orderByClause)
        Set the order by clause replacing the existing order by clause if there is one.

        This follows SQL syntax using commas between each property with the optional asc and desc keywords representing ascending and descending order respectively.

        This is EXACTLY the same as order(String).

      • order

        Query<Torder​(String orderByClause)
        Set the order by clause replacing the existing order by clause if there is one.

        This follows SQL syntax using commas between each property with the optional asc and desc keywords representing ascending and descending order respectively.

        This is EXACTLY the same as orderBy(String).

      • order

        OrderBy<Torder()
        Return the OrderBy so that you can append an ascending or descending property to the order by clause.

        This will never return a null. If no order by clause exists then an 'empty' OrderBy object is returned.

        This is EXACTLY the same as orderBy().

      • orderBy

        OrderBy<TorderBy()
        Return the OrderBy so that you can append an ascending or descending property to the order by clause.

        This will never return a null. If no order by clause exists then an 'empty' OrderBy object is returned.

        This is EXACTLY the same as order().

      • setDistinct

        Query<TsetDistinct​(boolean isDistinct)
        Set whether this query uses DISTINCT.

        The select() clause MUST be specified when setDistinct(true) is set. The reason for this is that generally ORM queries include the "id" property and this doesn't make sense for distinct queries.

        
        
           List<Customer> customers =
               DB.find(Customer.class)
                  .setDistinct(true)
                  .select("name")
                  .findList();
        
         
      • setCountDistinct

        Query<TsetCountDistinct​(CountDistinctOrder orderBy)
        Extended version for setDistinct in conjunction with "findSingleAttributeList";
        
        
          List<CountedValue<Order.Status>> orderStatusCount =
        
             DB.find(Order.class)
              .select("status")
              .where()
              .gt("orderDate", LocalDate.now().minusMonths(3))
        
              // fetch as single attribute with a COUNT
              .setCountDistinct(CountDistinctOrder.COUNT_DESC_ATTR_ASC)
              .findSingleAttributeList();
        
             for (CountedValue<Order.Status> entry : orderStatusCount) {
               System.out.println(" count:" + entry.getCount()+" orderStatus:" + entry.getValue() );
             }
        
           // produces
        
           count:3 orderStatus:NEW
           count:1 orderStatus:SHIPPED
           count:1 orderStatus:COMPLETE
        
         
      • getFirstRow

        int getFirstRow()
        Return the first row value.
      • setFirstRow

        Query<TsetFirstRow​(int firstRow)
        Set the first row to return for this query.
        Parameters:
        firstRow - the first row to include in the query result.
      • getMaxRows

        int getMaxRows()
        Return the max rows for this query.
      • setMaxRows

        Query<TsetMaxRows​(int maxRows)
        Set the maximum number of rows to return in the query.
        Parameters:
        maxRows - the maximum number of rows to return in the query.
      • setMapKey

        Query<TsetMapKey​(String mapKey)
        Set the property to use as keys for a map.

        If no property is set then the id property is used.

        
        
         // Assuming sku is unique for products...
        
         Map<String,Product> productMap = DB.find(Product.class)
             .setMapKey("sku")  // sku map keys...
             .findMap();
        
         
        Parameters:
        mapKey - the property to use as keys for a map.
      • setUseCache

        default Query<TsetUseCache​(boolean useCache)
        Set this to false to not use the bean cache.

        This method is now superseded by setBeanCacheMode(CacheMode) which provides more explicit options controlled bean cache use.

        This method is likely to be deprecated in the future with migration over to setUseBeanCache().

      • setBeanCacheMode

        Query<TsetBeanCacheMode​(CacheMode beanCacheMode)
        Set the mode to use the bean cache when executing this query.

        By default "find by id" and "find by natural key" will use the bean cache when bean caching is enabled. Setting this to false means that the query will not use the bean cache and instead hit the database.

        By default findList() with natural keys will not use the bean cache. In that case we need to explicitly use the bean cache.

      • setProfileId

        Query<TsetProfileId​(int profileId)
        Set an id to identify this query for profiling purposes.

        The profileId is expected to be unique for a given bean type.

        Note that the profileId is treated as a short internally and has a MAX value of 32,767.

      • setProfileLocation

        Query<TsetProfileLocation​(ProfileLocation profileLocation)
        Set the profile location of this query. This is used to relate query execution metrics back to a location like a specific line of code.
      • setLabel

        Query<TsetLabel​(String label)
        Set a label on the query.

        This label can be used to help identify query performance metrics but we can also use profile location enhancement on Finders so for some that would be a better option.

      • setUseDocStore

        Query<TsetUseDocStore​(boolean useDocStore)
        Set to true if this query should execute against the doc store.

        When setting this you may also consider disabling lazy loading.

      • setReadOnly

        Query<TsetReadOnly​(boolean readOnly)
        When set to true when you want the returned beans to be read only.
      • setLoadBeanCache

        Query<TsetLoadBeanCache​(boolean loadBeanCache)
        Will be deprecated - migrate to use setBeanCacheMode(CacheMode.RECACHE).

        When set to true all the beans from this query are loaded into the bean cache.

      • setTimeout

        Query<TsetTimeout​(int secs)
        Set a timeout on this query.

        This will typically result in a call to setQueryTimeout() on a preparedStatement. If the timeout occurs an exception will be thrown - this will be a SQLException wrapped up in a PersistenceException.

        Parameters:
        secs - the query timeout limit in seconds. Zero means there is no limit.
      • setBufferFetchSizeHint

        Query<TsetBufferFetchSizeHint​(int fetchSize)
        A hint which for JDBC translates to the Statement.fetchSize().

        Gives the JDBC driver a hint as to the number of rows that should be fetched from the database when more rows are needed for ResultSet.

        Note that internally findEach and findEachWhile will set the fetch size if it has not already as these queries expect to process a lot of rows. If we didn't then Postgres and MySql for example would eagerly pull back all the row data and potentially consume a lot of memory in the process.

        As findEach and findEachWhile automatically set the fetch size we don't have to do so generally but we might still wish to for tuning a specific use case.

      • getGeneratedSql

        String getGeneratedSql()
        Return the sql that was generated for executing this query.

        This is only available after the query has been executed and provided only for informational purposes.

      • forUpdate

        Query<TforUpdate()
        Execute using "for update" clause which results in the DB locking the record.
      • forUpdateNoWait

        Query<TforUpdateNoWait()
        Execute using "for update" clause with "no wait" option.

        This is typically a Postgres and Oracle only option at this stage.

      • forUpdateSkipLocked

        Query<TforUpdateSkipLocked()
        Execute using "for update" clause with "skip locked" option.

        This is typically a Postgres and Oracle only option at this stage.

      • isForUpdate

        boolean isForUpdate()
        Return true if this query has forUpdate set.
      • setBaseTable

        Query<TsetBaseTable​(String baseTable)
        Set the base table to use for this query.

        Typically this is used when a table has partitioning and we wish to specify a specific partition/table to query against.

        
        
           QOrder()
           .setBaseTable("order_2019_05")
           .status.equalTo(Status.NEW)
           .findList();
        
         
      • setInheritType

        Query<TsetInheritType​(Class<? extends T> type)
        Restrict the query to only return subtypes of the given inherit type.
        
        
           List<Animal> animals =
             new QAnimal()
               .name.startsWith("Fluffy")
               .setInheritType(Cat.class)
               .findList();
        
         
        Parameters:
        type - An inheritance subtype of the
      • getInheritType

        Class<? extends TgetInheritType()
        Returns the inherit type. This is normally the same as getBeanType() returns as long as no other type is set.
      • setDisableLazyLoading

        Query<TsetDisableLazyLoading​(boolean disableLazyLoading)
        Set true if you want to disable lazy loading.

        That is, once the object graph is returned further lazy loading is disabled.

      • validate

        Set<Stringvalidate()
        Returns the set of properties or paths that are unknown (do not map to known properties or paths).

        Validate the query checking the where and orderBy expression paths to confirm if they represent valid properties or paths for the given bean type.

      • orderById

        Query<TorderById​(boolean orderById)
        Controls, if paginated queries should always append an 'order by id' statement at the end to guarantee a deterministic sort result. This may affect performance. If this is not enabled, and an orderBy is set on the query, it's up to the programmer that this query provides a deterministic result.